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Usability testing. Customers come first.
Applications that are inconvenient for users quickly lose their value and, instead of long-awaited profit, bring to the owner empty pockets only. So how can we make a mobile application convenient, logical and understandable to the user? Find it out while reading the following post.
by Olga S
QA engenier
by Olga S
QA engenier
Here's a developer's nightmare
Let's assume that you've created a mobile application. Now you're accepted by the GooglePlay and the AppStore and ready to proudly present your brandchild to a wide audience. The marketing team worked perfectly, and the number of downloads of your application is growing steadily. "Where is the promised nightmare?" you may ask. Just wait for it. Here it comes, right at the moment when your first 150 users are leaving their first 150 comments. "Can't find the go-back button", "what does this icon mean?", "never figured out anything, so I'll delete your app", "exterminate! ©" If there are only three such reviews among the entire audience, you can sigh with relief and roll over. If they come from every other user, wake up and call to arms. Your team will have to cope with the consequences of poor usability testing.

Sometimes it happens that the development team has no budget for conducting professional usability testing. However, this is not a reason to refuse it. You can plan and implement usability testing yourself: the results will still be useful. The main thing is to follow the basic rules and know how to organize the process correctly.
Here's a developer's nightmare
Let's assume that you've created a mobile application. Now you're accepted by the GooglePlay and the AppStore and ready to proudly present your brandchild to a wide audience. The marketing team worked perfectly, and the number of downloads of your application is growing steadily. "Where is the promised nightmare?" you may ask. Just wait for it. Here it comes, right at the moment when your first 150 users are leaving their first 150 comments. "Can't find the go-back button", "what does this icon mean?", "never figured out anything, so I'll delete your app", "exterminate! ©" If there are only three such reviews among the entire audience, you can sigh with relief and roll over. If they come from every other user, wake up and call to arms. Your team will have to cope with the consequences of poor usability testing.

Sometimes it happens that the development team has no budget for conducting professional usability testing. However, this is not a reason to refuse it. You can plan and implement usability testing yourself: the results will still be useful. The main thing is to follow the basic rules and know how to organize the process correctly.
So what are the rules?
So what are the rules?
1. The first rule of the usability testing:
"you do not talk about the usability testing" your mobile app is no everyone's pleasure.

Identify your target audience and work with it directly. What are your users? Young mothers, schoolchildren, the elderly, students, businessmen, teenagers? Decide on the audience and let them meet your app.
2. The second rule of the usability testing:
2. The second rule of the usability testing:
*you do not talk about… oh, c'mon!* invite people who are not related to the development process.

After all, the real user always deals with the finished product. This will allow you to get reliable results. A motivated person will subconsciously try to do the testing as best as possible, but whom we need is one loose cannon.
*you do not talk about… oh, c'mon!* invite people who are not related to the development process.

After all, the real user always deals with the finished product. This will allow you to get reliable results. A motivated person will subconsciously try to do the testing as best as possible, but whom we need is one loose cannon.
What about the process itself?
Where to begin?
Here is a list for you.
What about the process itself?
Where to begin?
Here is a list for you.
1.Write some test cases
First, create a few characters that will represent your target audience. Set clear tasks for them. Suppose one of the characters in your target audience is a young woman who follows fashion trends and likes to buy online. Set a special task for her and give this task to one of your real testers. For example, "order a blue purse made of natural leather, then order shoes of your size to match this purse, and pay for the order using VISA".

To solve this task, a user needs to register in the application, use filters, select suitable products and enter the card details when making an online purchase. Do not forget that users will also need to pay for purchases. Make a test bank card with an impressive amount of money in the account.

Favor your testers with a pleasure of shopping! This way at least.
1.Write some test cases
First, create a few characters that will represent your target audience. Set clear tasks for them. Suppose one of the characters in your target audience is a young woman who follows fashion trends and likes to buy online. Set a special task for her and give this task to one of your real testers. For example, "order a blue purse made of natural leather, then order shoes of your size to match this purse, and pay for the order using VISA".

To solve this task, a user needs to register in the application, use filters, select suitable products and enter the card details when making an online purchase. Do not forget that users will also need to pay for purchases. Make a test bank card with an impressive amount of money in the account.

Favor your testers with a pleasure of shopping! This way at least.
For all users' actions, you need to determine the time – this parameter will help you understand how complicated or illogical the interface is. On average, the user devotes no more than 5 minutes to learn a new interface. If during this time the user fails to cope with the application, it may not get a second chance and will be deleted. If your application is multi-functional, it's better to write a few simple tasks.

For one test, 8-10 people are enough.
Testing time should not exceed 40 minutes.

2. Set the timing
3. Provide a background
Sure, it is necessary to bring the testing conditions closer to the intended application using conditions. But it is not always possible to conduct a test, for example, in a crowded subway. Therefore, always make a correction for the conditions under which usability testing was conducted. Remember that life's way more stressful.

Embed a data collection system in your application (for example, Google Analytics, Yandex.Metrika).

Look where the logic of your application leads the user with a specific task. For example, a person can easily cope with an order, but try to figure out how to pay for it for a long time. If there are several users with such problems, take urgent measures! It is important to remember: in usability testing, you first check your logic, because your task is to make the application clear to everyone.
3. Provide a background
Sure, it is necessary to bring the testing conditions closer to the intended application using conditions. But it is not always possible to conduct a test, for example, in a crowded subway. Therefore, always make a correction for the conditions under which usability testing was conducted. Remember that life's way more stressful.

Embed a data collection system in your application (for example, Google Analytics, Yandex.Metrika).

Look where the logic of your application leads the user with a specific task. For example, a person can easily cope with an order, but try to figure out how to pay for it for a long time. If there are several users with such problems, take urgent measures! It is important to remember: in usability testing, you first check your logic, because your task is to make the application clear to everyone.
After working with the application, suggest that users fill out a simple questionnaire: "how convenient was our program for you?", "what difficulties did you encounter?", "what would you like to improve?", etc.

For each question, prepare a few answers to make it easier for people to choose, or have them write their answer. These answers will bring you a lot of useful information. We bet you will be shocked when you realize that the huge (by your standards) "ORDER" button is not visible to 50% of your audience. "But it's right here, right here, flashing red!" Easy now, this is just the way things are. Get back to work and make this damn button visible.
4. Invite users to answer some questions
5. Analyze the results
Testing is done to check and improve the mobile application. To make the improvement happen, you need to put the test results together, isolate critical bugs, and then talk to the developers about how these bugs can be fixed.

After making changes, it is necessary to conduct a regression test, because, as you know, trying to fix something, we often make it worse.
5. Analyze the results
Testing is done to check and improve the mobile application. To make the improvement happen, you need to put the test results together, isolate critical bugs, and then talk to the developers about how these bugs can be fixed.

After making changes, it is necessary to conduct a regression test, because, as you know, trying to fix something, we often make it worse.
The problem of many applications, in our opinion, lies in poorly designed navigation and logic that is too complex. All these problems are solved on the basis of the usability testing results. It is almost impossible to predict the reaction and logic of real users. Therefore, now usability testing is carried out before the release and after the release 1 or 2 times a year. This allows the application to remain popular, and the team to make the necessary changes in a timely manner.
You too stay afloat! Follow the news. We're glad to be helpful.

We love what we do and do it with pleasure.
QAcamp team

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